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Chuck Guillory Interview

“Since I was four, five years old I liked music. I’d rather play music than eat.”

“George Jones, I’m the one who put him where he’s at…That man was poor. He begged me to play. I didn’t need him, I had a 7 piece band. I hired him anyway…five dollars a night…After the dance he would just sleep on the table ‘til daybreak and get a ride back to Beaumont.” – Chuck Guillory

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  • The Robert Stone Sacred Steel Archive: Elton Noble Interview 00:00
Interviewee: Chuck Guillory
Interviewer: Chris Strachwitz
Date: Oct 1, 1987
Location: Phone call from California to Louisiana
Language: English

To learn more about Chuck Guillory, listen to his interview in the Ann Savoy Collection

This is an interview originally recorded for research purposes. It is presented here in its raw state, unedited except to remove some irrelevant sections and blank spaces. All rights to the interview are reserved by the Arhoolie Foundation. Please do not use anything from this website without permission. info@arhoolie.org

Some interviews contain potentially offensive language, including obscenities and ethnic or racial slurs. In the interest of making this material fully available to scholars and the public, we have chosen not to censor this material.

For the complete history of the song “Grand Texas” visit the Early Cajun Music Blog

Chuck Guillory Interview Transcript:

Chuck Guillory:

Hello.

Chris Strachwitz:

Hey Chuck, this is Chris Strachwitz out in California, how are you doing?

Chuck Guillory:

Oh, great.

Chris Strachwitz:

Yeah.

Chuck Guillory:

How are we doing? Great?

Chris Strachwitz:

I’m doing pretty good I’m glad you called me, because I forgot to ever get a chance to have a little talk with you about your background, where you started and all that kind of … What is your real name? Is it Chuck Guillory or …

Chuck Guillory:

Yeah, that’s the way I want it on there.

Chris Strachwitz:

But your actual name is Murphy? Murphy Chuck Guillory?

Chuck Guillory:

Murphy Chuck Guillory.

Chris Strachwitz:

Where were you born at?

Chuck Guillory:

Mamou.

Chris Strachwitz:

In Mamou?

Chuck Guillory:

Yeah.

Chris Strachwitz:

What’s your birthday can I know?

Chuck Guillory:

Oh yeah, 1919.

Chris Strachwitz:

1919, what’s the day and the month?

Chuck Guillory:

The 16th.

Chris Strachwitz:

Which month?

Chuck Guillory:

August the 16th.

Chris Strachwitz:

August 16th so …

Chuck Guillory:

1919.

Chris Strachwitz:

Aha, so you just hit a birthday not too long ago.

Chuck Guillory:

Yeah.

Chris Strachwitz:

How did you get into fiddling?

Chuck Guillory:

Well, my old man used to tell, Chris.

Chris Strachwitz:

Mm-hmm (affirmative)?

Chuck Guillory:

But he didn’t teach me. He used to hire a sitter, I used to climb the whole time, you know? I used to steal his violin and come down and practice by myself and put it back up, you know?

Chris Strachwitz:

Mm-hmm (affirmative), but he did play pretty good, huh?

Chuck Guillory:

Oh yeah, he was a pretty good fiddle.

Chris Strachwitz:

How old were you when you first started playing with it?

Chuck Guillory:

Started playing that at eight years old.

Chris Strachwitz:

I’ll be darned. Was your father a farmer or …

Chuck Guillory:

Farmer.

Chris Strachwitz:

Did he play dances or …

Chuck Guillory:

Yeah, he played dance with me until I had to let him go. He couldn’t tolerate me no more.

Chris Strachwitz:

What was his name?

Chuck Guillory:

Madui Guillory. M-A-D-U-I.

Chris Strachwitz:

Madui, ah.

Chuck Guillory:

Madui, M-A-D-U-I.

Chris Strachwitz:

But he never recorded, did he?

Chuck Guillory:

No.

Chris Strachwitz:

How did you get to start playing dances? Was it did people kept asking for it?

Chuck Guillory:

I start playing the dance and he was playing with me, no?

Chris Strachwitz:

Mm-hmm (affirmative), and that was all around Mamou you started playing?

Chuck Guillory:

Well we play all over them place, close to Lake Charles and all.

Chris Strachwitz:

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Chuck Guillory:

The most time, hall you know, country hall. No fan, we didn’t have no fan. You talk about sweat. I remember that good, Chris. It wasn’t like right now, you know? Right now the air condition, Saturday night we played Natchez Mississippi.

Chris Strachwitz:

Oh, just this past Saturday?

Chuck Guillory:

Yeah, last Saturday past.

Chris Strachwitz:

Oh I see.

Chuck Guillory:

Last Saturday yeah, Natchez Mississippi.

Chris Strachwitz:

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Chuck Guillory:

My whole band. Cairo and I, we had a bass.

Chris Strachwitz:

Okay, let me … How did you happen to make those records, back I guess in the late ’40s, was it, when you made …

Chuck Guillory:

Yeah, me and Cairo?

Chris Strachwitz:

Yeah.

Chuck Guillory:

Well we made that in New Orleans.

Chris Strachwitz:

Mm-hmm (affirmative). Who was the man that came and did it?

Chuck Guillory:

Chris, I don’t remember. He was a dago. Yeah, he make me cut a Tolan more- I think it was eight to 10 times, so I started talking in French in there, you know? So he answer in French. He said, “I can’t speak French yet.” I was cussing, you know, so we all make a laugh at that. It went all right.

Chris Strachwitz:

How did you … What made you decide … Were you ever tempted to play accordion, or was it fiddle always your …

Chuck Guillory:

The fiddle. That’s my music.

Chris Strachwitz:

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Chuck Guillory:

Chris. It’s the fiddle.

Chris Strachwitz:

How would you put that. What’s the kind of sound that you like?

Chuck Guillory:

I like the French. I like French number on the fiddle.

Chris Strachwitz:

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Chuck Guillory:

Yeah and country and western on the fiddle, rock and roll, I can play anything they want. But like Saturday night we played, asked me but oh maybe 20 or 25 French numbers. We know them all, I know them all. And we played.

Chris Strachwitz:

Oh, okay.

Chuck Guillory:

Everyone there, we played.

Chris Strachwitz:

Do you remember the time when the accordion first came in or was it always fiddles where you grew up?

Chuck Guillory:

Yeah, I remember. I used to play. I made a couple of song with Milton Molitor, Chris.

Chris Strachwitz:

Oh yeah, that’s right. Was that for-

Chuck Guillory:

…I record that, me and him.

Chris Strachwitz:

Was that for Doctor Harry Oster?

Chuck Guillory:

No, we record that in Opelousas.

Chris Strachwitz:

Oh, he made some records up in Op …

Chuck Guillory:

Yeah, we made some, we cut that up in Opelousas.

Chris Strachwitz:

Milton Molitor …

Chuck Guillory:

Waltz and the- two step, I think it’s two, three record I record with that band, but he’s gone. He died.

Chris Strachwitz:

Mm-hmm (affirmative), he was the singer, huh?

Chuck Guillory:

Yeah, he sing high, high.

Chris Strachwitz:

Yeah, he was a good singer, I remember.

Chuck Guillory:

Oh yeah, he was one of the best accordion players I ever heard.

Chris Strachwitz:

Mm-hmm (affirmative), that was before you made your own? Or no, afterwards?

Chuck Guillory:

No, before.

Chris Strachwitz:

Before, mm-hmm (affirmative). Do you remember who that was for, but?

Chuck Guillory:

No, Chris, I don’t remember.

Chris Strachwitz:

Don’t remember that.

Chuck Guillory:

In fact, I can find, though I can find out. People around here …

Chris Strachwitz:

I think I may have the record, I’ll just have to look for it under Milton Molitor’s name.

Chuck Guillory:

Yeah, Milton Molitor.

Chris Strachwitz:

And then when that … What was your biggest seller, was that the Grand Texas?

Chuck Guillory:

Yeah Big Texas and Tolan Waltz.

Chris Strachwitz:

The Tolan Waltz, mm-hmm (affirmative).

Chuck Guillory:

And then me and Jimmy we record Chere Petite and I don’t remember, we recorded a lot of records.

Chris Strachwitz:

You also backed up Jimmy Newman?

Chuck Guillory:

Oh yes. Jimmy played for me, I’m the one put him where he’s at there.

Chris Strachwitz:

Ah, I see, I see. Oh you started him?

Chuck Guillory:

Oh yes, Chris, I’m not lying to you.

Chris Strachwitz:

Mm-hmm (affirmative)?

Chuck Guillory:

George Jones I’m the one put him where he’s at there.

Chris Strachwitz:

Oh is that right?

Chuck Guillory:

George Jones, I used to pay him, I had my full band, that man was poor and he begged me to play. I didn’t need him, I had a seven piece band. I hired him anyway. Five dollar a night.

Chris Strachwitz:

Where was that at?

Chuck Guillory:

In Lake Charles.

Chris Strachwitz:

In Lake Charles.

Chuck Guillory:

He used to live in Beaumont, him.

Chris Strachwitz:

Oh, he came from Beaumont?

Chuck Guillory:

On the ride, a ride.

Chris Strachwitz:

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Chuck Guillory:

No car. And then cheap guitar, his box was all busted. After the dance, Chris, I want you to put that on the paper, wherever you want.

Chris Strachwitz:

I will.

Chuck Guillory:

After the dance, he used to sleep on the table until daybreak and get a ride back to Beaumont.

Chris Strachwitz:

Is that right…

Chuck Guillory:

Oh yeah, I’m not … That’s right, yeah.

Chris Strachwitz:

That was George Jones, about what year was that, do you remember? Was that before the war ended, or after the war?

Chuck Guillory:

After the war.

Chris Strachwitz:

After the war, yeah.

Chuck Guillory:

Oh yeah, you can put that. Hey, I can guarantee you it’s right.

Chris Strachwitz:

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Chuck Guillory:

Not pulling your leg.

Chris Strachwitz:

You had a seven piece band. What club were you working at?

Chuck Guillory:

At the Silver Star.

Chris Strachwitz:

At the Silver Star in Lake Charles. And who did you have in your band, do you remember some of the guys?

Chuck Guillory:

I had Jimmy.

Chris Strachwitz:

What did he play, guitar?

Chuck Guillory:

Guitar, yes. I have a piano player, his name is … Let me see, he live in Baton Rouge now, he don’t play no more. Then I have Tommy Gonslei in trumpet.

Chris Strachwitz:

What was his name? Tommy? Tommy Flannagan?

Chuck Guillory:

No, Gonslei.

Chris Strachwitz:

Gonslei?

Chuck Guillory:

Gonslei, yeah. Gonslei.

Chris Strachwitz:

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Chuck Guillory:

On the trumpet. Then I had Curzy on the drum.

Chris Strachwitz:

Oh yeah, ol’ Porkchop.

Chuck Guillory:

Porkchop. Then I had a bass fiddle, Tom [Leclaud 00:07:54] or something like that, but he’s dead. Then there’s Duhon.

Chris Strachwitz:

Who was that.

Chuck Guillory:

Bass fiddle.

Chris Strachwitz:

Oh, he was a Duhon?

Chuck Guillory:

Yeah. He died.

Chris Strachwitz:

And would you play mostly French pieces at that time or half and half?

Chuck Guillory:

Half and half, Chris.

Chris Strachwitz:

Mm-hmm (affirmative), they like the country music a lot too?

Chuck Guillory:

Oh yeah, they like it.

Chris Strachwitz:

Did George Jones sing with you at that time?

Chuck Guillory:

Oh yes.

Chris Strachwitz:

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Chuck Guillory:

He sang English number.

Chris Strachwitz:

I’ll be darned.

Chuck Guillory:

But he didn’t write no song that time. He was singing the song was out, all them record was out.

Chris Strachwitz:

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Chuck Guillory:

But he was good. I knew he was going somewhere.

Chris Strachwitz:

How long after that did he start making records?

Chuck Guillory:

Oh Chris, about a year, I think about a year and a half two years after that.

Chris Strachwitz:

Mm-hmm (affirmative), something like that. And then Jimmy Newman, he also wasn’t known at that time, was he?

Chuck Guillory:

Jimmy, when I hire him.

Chris Strachwitz:

Yeah?

Chuck Guillory:

He didn’t know where to start, when to quit, he didn’t know nothing.

Chris Strachwitz:

I see.

Chuck Guillory:

At the time I was playing every night.

Chris Strachwitz:

Did you play fiddle on those things that he cut for Khoury for George Khoury?

Chuck Guillory:

I think so.

Chris Strachwitz:

Oh you did? I’ll have to listen to that. Because I think he made that his first records for Khoury didn’t he?

Chuck Guillory:

I think I did, Chris.

Chris Strachwitz:

Mm-hmm (affirmative). I forgot the name of it, but it was one or two numbers, I think. And then what’s your … How you’ve been making a living since then? Did the music kind of go down a little bit after that or …

Chuck Guillory:

Well, yeah, the music went down. You know, opened a big store here in my home town.

Chris Strachwitz:

Oh, you have a store there in Mamou?

Chuck Guillory:

Yeah, for 27 years.

Chris Strachwitz:

Oh really? What’s the name of it?

Chuck Guillory:

Guillory Superette. I made my pocket full. Then I just sold it again, Chris.

Chris Strachwitz:

You …

Chuck Guillory:

I had to close it at six, seven year. I didn’t need it anymore. I closed it.

Chris Strachwitz:

Oh, you just closed it.

Chuck Guillory:

I remodeled, then I just sold it last week.

Chris Strachwitz:

So you can retire now.

Chuck Guillory:

I didn’t need it anymore, you know? I kept some lying on the left side there. You never came to my house? I don’t think so.

Chris Strachwitz:

No, I don’t think I ever did. I think the first time I met you I came to the store, actually, I came to that Superette.

Chuck Guillory:

Yeah?

Chris Strachwitz:

I believe so.

Chuck Guillory:

On the north side I got two big lots and I got the street and everything. I kept that, I didn’t sell that. Put some … I got a trailer already on there, I’ll put maybe another one there.

Chris Strachwitz:

Oh good. And have you known old Preston for a long time?

Chuck Guillory:

Oh Lord, yeah.

Chris Strachwitz:

He goes …

Chuck Guillory:

The man is doing good. He played Saturday, I got to watch him, you know? I’ve got to watch him, because he’s like a kid.

Chris Strachwitz:

Yeah, he’s … So he don’t drink too much, huh?

Chuck Guillory:

That’s right, I got to watch him, but he play some music. You can’t find better than that. But you watch him. You’ve got to watch him.

Chris Strachwitz:

That’s right, yeah. Well good, so you still have an opportunity to play on weekends sometimes when …

Chuck Guillory:

Oh yeah, we play all we want, Chris.

Chris Strachwitz:

Oh really? Good.

Chuck Guillory:

Listen, that’s one thing I want to ask you.

Chris Strachwitz:

Mm-hmm (affirmative)?

Chuck Guillory:

If you see something for us over there, we’ll go. Help us out over there.

Chris Strachwitz:

Oh yeah, well I’ll try, but it’s hard with all these young bands coming in here trying to play for nothing. It’s hard to get any money out of anybody.

Chuck Guillory:

Yeah, it be a different style though, if we go over there.

Chris Strachwitz:

That’s true. Any of your brothers and sisters play music, or are you kind of the only one?

Chuck Guillory:

No, I got one of my brothers, Bernard, he used to play a little bit of violin, but not good.

Chris Strachwitz:

Not real good?

Chuck Guillory:

No, he used to play a few songs, you know? But me and my old man.

Chris Strachwitz:

What would you say … Why did you start playing music?

Chuck Guillory:

I don’t know, Chris. Every time since I’m four, five years old I like music.

Chris Strachwitz:

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Chuck Guillory:

And I’m still I like music. I’d rather play music than eat. It’s true. My wife say, what’s the matter with you? I say, I like that.

Chris Strachwitz:

Yeah?

Chuck Guillory:

I got three television over here, and I just got this … You know we got this race coming up the 24th?

Chris Strachwitz:

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Chuck Guillory:

Send me a Gazette in the mail, one of my governor, Billy Tauzin, he’s running for governor, he talk about some good music. I just got it in there yesterday. I playing. I got my radio in my truck and in her car wide open all the time. I enjoy music.

Chris Strachwitz:

Who did you like when you were growing up? Who did you listen behind?

Chuck Guillory:

Well, some of them boys they’re all gone. Leo Soileau. You remember that?

Chris Strachwitz:

Oh yeah.

Chuck Guillory:

You remember Leo? Harry Choates. I like Harry Choates.

Chris Strachwitz:

Did you ever see him play?

Chuck Guillory:

Oh yes. I won the contest, one Saturday in Eunice.

Chris Strachwitz:

Oh really?

Chuck Guillory:

Yeah, one Saturday at 12:00 they had contest, violin contest, I won everybody there.

Chris Strachwitz:

When was it, you remember the year or something?

Chuck Guillory:

Chris … If I tell you I lie to you. It’s a good while back.

Chris Strachwitz:

Yeah, I know.

Chuck Guillory:

It was about …

Chris Strachwitz:

Shortly after the second war was it?

Chuck Guillory:

Yeah, it was about 50 year.

Chris Strachwitz:

Yeah, it’s a long time ago, huh?

Chuck Guillory:

55 year. But it was a contest.

Chris Strachwitz:

Who put on the contest?

Chuck Guillory:

The mayor of Eunice.

Chris Strachwitz:

Oh really?

Chuck Guillory:

And the one who won the contest, he had to play the dance that night.

Chris Strachwitz:

Ah, I see.

Chuck Guillory:

You understand?

Chris Strachwitz:

Yeah.

Chuck Guillory:

For the same price. They had him cash that. But in these days it was a lot of money, I think it was $50. $50 if you win the first prize, then you have to play at the dance.

Chris Strachwitz:

Mm-hmm (affirmative), who else was in the contest, do you remember, besides Harry Choates?

Chuck Guillory:

Leo Soileau also was there.

Chris Strachwitz:

Oh he was there?

Chuck Guillory:

And Alius Soileau. I don’t think you …

Chris Strachwitz:

Oh yes, I’ve heard of him.

Chuck Guillory:

He was there too. Leo, they was cousins.

Chris Strachwitz:

Oh they were cousins, I wasn’t quite sure how they were related, yeah.

Chuck Guillory:

Yeah. So you know important people, huh?

Chris Strachwitz:

Oh yeah, I’ve heard some of their records.

Chuck Guillory:

Oh yeah?

Chris Strachwitz:

Yeah. And he made some discs together with Leo.

Chuck Guillory:

Mm-hmm (affirmative), yes.

Chris Strachwitz:

I’ve been having a hard time finding them …

Chuck Guillory:

My brother in law, he’s gone, hold on, I forgot his name. How do you like that? My brother in law, he’s dead these five, six years.

Chris Strachwitz:

Oh was it …

Chuck Guillory:

Isaac Soileau.

Chris Strachwitz:

Oh Isaac Soileau, mm-hmm (affirmative).

Chuck Guillory:

He was there too.

Chris Strachwitz:

Was Cheese Read there or somebody like that?

Chuck Guillory:

No, Cheese wasn’t … I don’t think he was good enough to be in the …

Chris Strachwitz:

He wasn’t quite the …

Chuck Guillory:

No, he wasn’t there to play fiddle.

Chris Strachwitz:

But those were it, the Soileaus, three Soileaus, huh?

Chuck Guillory:

Yeah Soileau. Alius, Leo and Isaac.

Chris Strachwitz:

Mm-hmm (affirmative), and then Harry Choates came over from … Where was he living at the time?

Chuck Guillory:

Sulphur.

Chris Strachwitz:

In Sulphur? Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Chuck Guillory:

Yeah.

Chris Strachwitz:

I guess Luderin Darbone wasn’t playing much at that time?

Chuck Guillory:

No, Luderin wasn’t there.

Chris Strachwitz:

Mm-hmm (affirmative), that was the real cajun stuff, huh?

Chuck Guillory:

You remember Luderin pretty good?

Chris Strachwitz:

Oh yeah, I know him real well, yeah.

Chuck Guillory:

He was very good in that time.

Chris Strachwitz:

Yeah, he sure was, yeah. Him and his Hackberry Ramblers, yeah. I liked the way Lennis sang.

Chuck Guillory:

Yeah.

Chris Strachwitz:

He was a good singer.

Chuck Guillory:

I like him. They used to play here- at this hall, they used to play at our hall in Mamou and I used to go listen to them.

Chris Strachwitz:

Oh yeah, what was the name of the hall?

Chuck Guillory:

Cazo? Cazo Fontenot Hall.

Chris Strachwitz:

Cazo Fontenot.

Chuck Guillory:

Cazo, it’s a French name, Cazo Fontenot Hall, they used to play there. No fan.

Chris Strachwitz:

No …

Chuck Guillory:

Open window outside, you know the mall door?

Chris Strachwitz:

Did you grow up speaking French pretty much?

Chuck Guillory:

Oh yeah.

Chris Strachwitz:

When did you learn English?

Chuck Guillory:

When I went to school.

Chris Strachwitz:

Mm-hmm (affirmative), in school.

Chuck Guillory:

Hard time. I had to walk 15 miles to go to school.

Chris Strachwitz:

Oh boy, really?

Chuck Guillory:

Yeah, walk, and a piece of cornbread and a little pint of milk. We was raised, we were seven in the family.

Chris Strachwitz:

And that was way out in the country?

Chuck Guillory:

Way out in the country, go to school, play dance to raise my family. I’m the one that raise them all.

Chris Strachwitz:

Oh really? Oh boy.

Chuck Guillory:

At that time I used to go in Eunice, me and my old man play in them saloon. Nick’s bar.

Chris Strachwitz:

Which one?

Chuck Guillory:

Nick.

Chris Strachwitz:

Nick’s …

Chuck Guillory:

Nick Ferro bar.

Chris Strachwitz:

Nick’s Ferro?

Chuck Guillory:

Yeah, that’s a dago.

Chris Strachwitz:

He’s Italian?

Chuck Guillory:

Dago, yeah.

Chris Strachwitz:

F-E-R-R-O?

Chuck Guillory:

Yes.

Chris Strachwitz:

Like …

Chuck Guillory:

Nick Ferro, yes.

Chris Strachwitz:

Okay, his bar. That was in Eunice?

Chuck Guillory:

In Eunice, right on Main Street. It’s still there, the bar’s still there.

Chris Strachwitz:

Oh really?

Chuck Guillory:

Oh yeah, it’s wide open.

Chris Strachwitz:

Huh.

Chuck Guillory:

We used to go, Chris, every Saturday afternoon. I was seven and a half years old.

Chris Strachwitz:

I’ll be darned.

Chuck Guillory:

We used to sit down there, me and my old man, we used to pick up $10, $15 every Saturday.

Chris Strachwitz:

I’ll be darned.

Chuck Guillory:

Quarter and nickel and dime. That was money in that time.

Chris Strachwitz:

Yeah, that was in the mid 1920s.

Chuck Guillory:

Yes.

Chris Strachwitz:

Would you just have the two fiddles, that’d be it?

Chuck Guillory:

Two fiddles that time. Just for entertain them people in the …

Chris Strachwitz:

Yeah, did you father sing or …

Chuck Guillory:

No, no.

Chris Strachwitz:

Both of you just played?

Chuck Guillory:

Yeah, but I used to sing a little bit.

Chris Strachwitz:

Oh you did? I see.

Chuck Guillory:

I’m the one sing in Tolan Waltz.

Chris Strachwitz:

Oh you sing the Tolan Waltz? Oh that’s right. Oh yeah.

Chuck Guillory:

Yeah.

Chris Strachwitz:

Mm-hmm (affirmative). And then you … Where did you go from that bar? Did you play there for many years or …

Chuck Guillory:

No, we didn’t play too long there.

Chris Strachwitz:

Didn’t do too long, huh?

Chuck Guillory:

No. Then I start playing dance.

Chris Strachwitz:

Then you start playing dance.

Chuck Guillory:

Eight years old, nine, 10, then I went up higher.

Chris Strachwitz:

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Chuck Guillory:

Then I had to let the old man go. He couldn’t follow me no more, and I had to get better musicians, you know?

Chris Strachwitz:

You got better than him, huh?

Chuck Guillory:

Yeah, that’s right. You know it’s bad when you’ve got to let your old man go.

Chris Strachwitz:

Yeah.

Chuck Guillory:

But I had to.

Chris Strachwitz:

Mm-hmm (affirmative). Well that’s an interesting story, well I think I got enough, and I think …

Chuck Guillory:

Okay, you talk pretty good with Cairo at the …

Chris Strachwitz:

Yeah, I got some story on him, you know …

Chuck Guillory:

Yeah, he got some big story too. Well, we had a good time, Chris, Saturday. I drove all the way to over there. All the way gone.

Chris Strachwitz:

Mm-hmm (affirmative)?

Chuck Guillory:

Then Cairo drove all the way back.

Chris Strachwitz:

Oh he did, yeah?

Chuck Guillory:

We came back at 5:00 Sunday morning.

Chris Strachwitz:

Was it a concert or dance?

Chuck Guillory:

Dance, dance.

Chris Strachwitz:

Okay. Oh good.

Chuck Guillory:

5000, 6000 people.

Chris Strachwitz:

Oh really? So it’s catching up in Mississippi?

Chuck Guillory:

Oh yeah, they call it little Las Vegas. They’ve got slot machines.

Chris Strachwitz:

Oh is that right?

Chuck Guillory:

And they’ve got card games. They’ve got dice game, they’ve got anything you want.

Chris Strachwitz:

Oh they got something …

Chuck Guillory:

It’s on a big hill, Chris.

Chris Strachwitz:

What’s the name of the town?

Chuck Guillory:

Natchez, Mississippi.

Chris Strachwitz:

Oh up in Natchez? I’ll be darned.

Chuck Guillory:

Slot machine, they got some a dollar, 50 cents, a quarter, you’ve got to stand in line to play.

Chris Strachwitz:

I’ll be darned.

Chuck Guillory:

They call it little Las Vegas, but the name of the place we playing at, we’re going to play every 15 days.

Chris Strachwitz:

Oh is that right?

Chuck Guillory:

It’s the … I name it a while ago, I’m bad for names. That’s a big place.

Chris Strachwitz:

Is it a big hall with …

Chuck Guillory:

Big, yeah. You got the restaurant in there, you got your slot machine, you got … Anything you want you’ve got.

Chris Strachwitz:

Oh really?

Chuck Guillory:

[inaudible 00:19:33] how far is that, Chris?

Chris Strachwitz:

California?

Chuck Guillory:

Yeah, where you live.

Chris Strachwitz:

It’s about 2000 miles from where you live.

Chuck Guillory:

Oh Lord …

Chris Strachwitz:

Yeah, it’s a long ways.

Chuck Guillory:

Yeah. I saw it on TV they got a big … You saw that on TV, earthquake?

Chris Strachwitz:

Yeah, they had an earthquake down in Los Angeles today. Yeah, but I’m way north, I’m about 500 miles north of there.

Chuck Guillory:

Oh, it didn’t touch y’all?

Chris Strachwitz:

No, it didn’t touch us up here, no.

Chuck Guillory:

Okay, Chris.

Chris Strachwitz:

All right, well thanks a lot.

Chuck Guillory:

Okay then.

Chris Strachwitz:

Good, bye, bye.

Chuck Guillory:

Bye.

Chris Strachwitz:

Bye.

 

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